Shaolin Wahnam: a school with a complete methodology

The logo of the Shaolin Wahnam Institute. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

The logo of the Shaolin Wahnam Institute. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

In early 2013 May, some guys on the G+ Martial Artist and Internal Martial Artist forums were discussing cross-training and when to do so. Ever since joining Shaolin Wahnam, I’ve felt absolutely no need to train outside of the school, other than finding some new sparring partners (I live several states away from my nearest Shaolin Wahnam family member). Anywho, here’s what I had to say on the subject of training outside of one’s home school:

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Favorite kung fu movie scenes

Zhang Ziyi performs some of the best Baguazhang choreography ever in her role as Gong Er in the movie The Grandmasters. Image taken from www.china.org.cn

Zhang Ziyi performs some of the best Baguazhang choreography ever in her role as Gong Er in the movie The Grandmasters. Image taken from http://www.china.org.cn

We were having a discussion on 2013 May 7 about a list of “the 20 most devastating moves in martial arts films.” Here’s what I had to say about that list and some other scenes I’d have added to the list.

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Power generation in kung fu

"Single Whip" is a famous Taijiquan pattern that is often used to practice exploding force. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

“Single Whip,” demonstrated by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, is a famous Taijiquan pattern that is often used to practice exploding force. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

There was a G+ question about how power is generated various styles of martial arts on 2013 May 11. Here was my response, from the kung fu paradigm:

Power generation comes from what’s called “spiral force” in kung fu. By rotating the waist (in addition to maintaining other harmonies), force is transferred from the abdomen to the fist (or foot, shoulder, etc.) This is most often expressed in the phrase, “Striking force begins in the heel, is guided by the waist, and manifests in the fingers.”

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Martial arts, not for fighting?

Someone who has spent much time boxing would naturally use boxing in their sparring and fighting. Image taken from www.croatia.org

Someone who has spent much time perfecting their boxing skills would naturally use boxing in their sparring and fighting. It would be disadvantageous for them to throw away their boxing to use complicated kung fu moves in sparring or fighting. Image taken from http://www.croatia.org

It was mentioned on the LinkedIn Martial Artists forum that martial arts were not for fighting. Being rather confused, at such a bold statement, I felt compelled to respond with the following.

I have to disagree that martial arts are not for fighting. What one uses in friendly sparring or an actual fighting situation should be the art, style, or method that one has been trained in; hence, martial arts are used in fighting.

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