Easing Off on Over-Training

Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Alone Chop the Hua Mountain, a popular pattern in Baguazhang.

Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Alone Chop the Hua Mountain, a popular pattern in Baguazhang.

Hey there, folks! Been an age since I posted. Just finished my family medicine rotation earlier today. Working hours were far longer than I was expecting these past few weeks. Had some interesting experiences working with a physician who specializes in addiction medicine. Gave me more than a few neat memories, not to mention gave me an impression as to the nature of my perspective on training. It’s always a nice experience to have folks chatting about the current popular topics, like over-training (I wonder what other subjects people feel like keying in on? There don’t seem to be many subjects that capture the forum’s attention with as much fervor); thank you to the folks who responded with their insights on the matter.

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Fundamental force training; also, I have a camera now

Me on 2014 July 21 practicing a basic Hung Gar force training method called Double Stabilizing Golden Bridge.

Me on 2014 July 21 practicing a basic Hung Gar force training method called Double Stabilizing Golden Bridge.

Egad, looks like WordPress has changed a bit on me, especially the user interface for writing a new post. Let’s see how long it takes for me to get used to this one.

Anyways, as I mentioned last time, I began learning Hung Gar kung fu from Sifu Dexter Parker in Peoria. Being that he comes from a traditional school, naturally, he assessed my stances and footwork before giving me exercises to work on in order to develop force.

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Full body power and sequences in sparring

Kung fu and Boxing use very different manners of attack, defense, developing power, issuing that power, and strategies. Here, Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit attacks with White Snake Shoots Venom while his disciple wards off the attack with Beauty Looks at Mirror. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

Kung fu and Boxing use very different manners of attack, defense, developing power, issuing that power, and strategies. Here, Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit and his disciple spar using Taijiquan. Grandmaster Wong attacks with White Snake Shoots Venom while his disciple wards off the attack with Beauty Looks at Mirror. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

I had a discussion with someone asking about power generation and someone else who disagreed with the notion of sequence training being useful for sparring, as well as the principles of “safety first” in sparring or fighting. Here’s how I replied to them:

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Force training, cross training, angles, and sequences

All kung fu styles have characteristic stances used to develop force. Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Golden Bridge, the most characteristic stance chosen for force training in Southern Shaolin kung fu. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

All kung fu styles have characteristic stances used to develop force. Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Golden Bridge, the most important stance for force training in Southern Shaolin kung fu. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

A discussion in 2013 May cropped up in the G+ Martial Artist forums about force training and cross training, with a little bit of sparring methodology and angles of attack. Here’s what I had to say:

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Cross training and sparring methodology

Free sparring is used to test, not train, fighting skills in Shaolin Wahnam. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

Free sparring is used to test, not train, fighting skills in Shaolin Wahnam. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

Back in mid-May of 2013, I posed a question to the G+ Martial Artist community regarding cross-training and sparring methodologies used in their schools. After a few responses, someone asked my opinion on their situations. Here’s what I replied with:

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Northern or Southern, Internal or External?

Baguazhang, demonstrated here by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, is often considered an internal style of kung fu. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

Baguazhang, demonstrated here by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, is often considered an internal style of kung fu. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

Someone asked the very good question of what kung fu system would be best for them. Naturally, this is informed by many factors such as what you want to get out of kung fu, what you are willing to put up with, if a master is willing and able to teach you, etc. Here is what I replied with:

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