Full body power and sequences in sparring

Kung fu and Boxing use very different manners of attack, defense, developing power, issuing that power, and strategies. Here, Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit attacks with White Snake Shoots Venom while his disciple wards off the attack with Beauty Looks at Mirror. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

Kung fu and Boxing use very different manners of attack, defense, developing power, issuing that power, and strategies. Here, Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit and his disciple spar using Taijiquan. Grandmaster Wong attacks with White Snake Shoots Venom while his disciple wards off the attack with Beauty Looks at Mirror. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

I had a discussion with someone asking about power generation and someone else who disagreed with the notion of sequence training being useful for sparring, as well as the principles of “safety first” in sparring or fighting. Here’s how I replied to them:

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Just five techniques

If you could pick just five techniques to practice, what would they be?

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Offense, defense, and hurting your opponents?

How much force is too much? Do we really have to maim our opponents? How proactive or reactive should we be in a sparring match or a fight? Is showing mercy to an opponent a worthwhile endeavor? How did past masters react?

The question of the day on the LinkedIn Martial Artists forum was the relative amount of offense and defense used in various arts and how much was “too much” force.

"Bail Moon From Sea Bottom," a potentially fatal and combat ending grip to the groin.  Image taken from www.shaolin.org

“Bail Moon From Sea Bottom,” a potentially fatal and combat ending grip to the groin. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

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