Fundamental force training; also, I have a camera now

Me on 2014 July 21 practicing a basic Hung Gar force training method called Double Stabilizing Golden Bridge.

Me on 2014 July 21 practicing a basic Hung Gar force training method called Double Stabilizing Golden Bridge.

Egad, looks like WordPress has changed a bit on me, especially the user interface for writing a new post. Let’s see how long it takes for me to get used to this one.

Anyways, as I mentioned last time, I began learning Hung Gar kung fu from Sifu Dexter Parker in Peoria. Being that he comes from a traditional school, naturally, he assessed my stances and footwork before giving me exercises to work on in order to develop force.

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Force training, cross training, angles, and sequences

All kung fu styles have characteristic stances used to develop force. Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Golden Bridge, the most characteristic stance chosen for force training in Southern Shaolin kung fu. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

All kung fu styles have characteristic stances used to develop force. Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit demonstrates Golden Bridge, the most important stance for force training in Southern Shaolin kung fu. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

A discussion in 2013 May cropped up in the G+ Martial Artist forums about force training and cross training, with a little bit of sparring methodology and angles of attack. Here’s what I had to say:

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The survival of authentic kung fu

Venerable Hai Deng, who was famous for his One Finger Zen skill, was the last abbot of the Shaolin temple who advocated traditional kung fu training. After he left the Shaolin temple in the 1960's, the focus of the Shaolin temple gradually shifted towards demonstration wushu rather than martial arts. Image reproduced from www.shaolin.org

Venerable Hai Deng, who was famous for his One Finger Zen skill, was the last abbot of the Shaolin temple who advocated traditional kung fu training. After he resigned in the 1960’s, the focus of the Shaolin temple gradually shifted towards demonstration wushu rather than traditional kung fu. Image reproduced from http://www.shaolin.org

Many kung fu practitioners have heard of the Cultural Revolution in China which led to the death or exile of many practitioners of traditional arts, including kung fu. In fact, many people have the mistaken belief that no authentic kung fu exists anymore!

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Learn from a master. You’ll live longer.

Hey there, fellow Rubiks Cubers. Cubists? Puzzlers? Kungfubes? I don’t know, I don’t have enough of a fan base to really call anyone anything. Put your own recommendation in the comments below!

As you might be aware, kung fu is something very dear to my heart. I am quite annoyed at the debasement of kung fu and Taijiquan in general to mere “kung fu-do” and “tai chi dance.” On the one hand, it is wonderful that we live in a society where you do not need martial arts merely to walk down the street. On the other hand, these wonderful arts have been thrown so far from their roots that it is cringe-inducing to see people who say they “know kung fu” or “do Tai Chi” performing virtually every little thing wrong.

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