Shaolin Wahnam: a school with a complete methodology

The logo of the Shaolin Wahnam Institute. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

The logo of the Shaolin Wahnam Institute. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

In early 2013 May, some guys on the G+ Martial Artist and Internal Martial Artist forums were discussing cross-training and when to do so. Ever since joining Shaolin Wahnam, I’ve felt absolutely no need to train outside of the school, other than finding some new sparring partners (I live several states away from my nearest Shaolin Wahnam family member). Anywho, here’s what I had to say on the subject of training outside of one’s home school:

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Your martial arts role models?

My sifu (Master Antony Korahais, left) and sigung (Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, right). Image taken from www.flowingzen.com

My sifu (Master Antony Korahais, left) and sigung (Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, right). They have what I want and are willing to teach it, and I am proud to be their student and very proud that I can call them my teachers. Image taken from http://www.flowingzen.com

 

This may sound quaint, but my role models in the martial arts are my master and grandmaster. Both are life-loving, easy to smile or laugh, and literally life-saving people who have dedicated their lives to training, systematizing, and spreading their arts to the public.

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Qualities of an amazing master

I touched on this subject not too long ago, but bears repeating again: a great master will save you time and tears in the long run. We had a discussion on LinkedIn back in 2013 April about what makes an amazing instructor. Here was my response, which applies not only to martial arts, but to life in general:

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Learn from a master. You’ll live longer.

Hey there, fellow Rubiks Cubers. Cubists? Puzzlers? Kungfubes? I don’t know, I don’t have enough of a fan base to really call anyone anything. Put your own recommendation in the comments below!

As you might be aware, kung fu is something very dear to my heart. I am quite annoyed at the debasement of kung fu and Taijiquan in general to mere “kung fu-do” and “tai chi dance.” On the one hand, it is wonderful that we live in a society where you do not need martial arts merely to walk down the street. On the other hand, these wonderful arts have been thrown so far from their roots that it is cringe-inducing to see people who say they “know kung fu” or “do Tai Chi” performing virtually every little thing wrong.

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