Harmonies and planes in kung fu stances

A discussion on the G+ forums turned towards stances and directions used in different styles of kung fu. There are certain difficulties involved even in discussing different types of kung fu thanks to certain phrases meaning different things to different people. One example in this thread came from the Three Body stance of Xingyiquan:

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Developing and exploding force in kung fu

Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit teaching the horse riding stance, perhaps the most important and fundamental exercise in all of kung fu. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit teaching the horse riding stance, perhaps the most important and fundamental exercise in all of kung fu. Force must be developed before it can be used for combat. You wouldn’t try shooting an empty gun, would you? Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

A discussion on the G+ forums back in 2013 May led to the subject of fa jing, or “exploding force.” This is the usual term used by kung fu practitioners to describe manifesting their force in various ways, usually an explosive or powerful strike.

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Power generation in kung fu

"Single Whip" is a famous Taijiquan pattern that is often used to practice exploding force. Image taken from www.shaolin.org

“Single Whip,” demonstrated by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit, is a famous Taijiquan pattern that is often used to practice exploding force. Image taken from http://www.shaolin.org

There was a G+ question about how power is generated various styles of martial arts on 2013 May 11. Here was my response, from the kung fu paradigm:

Power generation comes from what’s called “spiral force” in kung fu. By rotating the waist (in addition to maintaining other harmonies), force is transferred from the abdomen to the fist (or foot, shoulder, etc.) This is most often expressed in the phrase, “Striking force begins in the heel, is guided by the waist, and manifests in the fingers.”

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